Google Plus is Gone: How to Use Twitter Instead & Get Results

Twitter vs Google+

Google Plus is shutting down on April 2, 2019.

Twitter Follow MeGuess what? Everything you did on Google+ (G+) you can do on Twitter and continue to get the SEO and exposure benefits.

It was once said,

On LinkedIn and Facebook you connect with people you already know. On G+ you can connect with people you’d like to know. 

And it was easy to network — connect with, follow and get noticed — by folks you’d like to meet. You can do that on Twitter, too! 

What about SEO?

Tweets come up in Google search. They have for years. And you can retweet over and over again — within reason — and not be considered as over-posting. Sharing the links to your website on Twitter creates legit back links. So keep blogging and keep sharing — not just your stuff!

Using the free JetPack plugin for WordPress (WP) websites, you can automatically share your blog articles to Twitter as soon as it’s published.

There’s another free-to-a-point plugin for WP called Revive Old Posts which will automatically share random blog articles to Twitter at a given interval — like every 4 hours. Don’t start this until you have about 20 articles in your blog, otherwise it will be tweeting out the same thing. Start with an interval of every 12 hours once you have about 10 articles. You can exclude any posts that may be time-sensitive.

Circles on G+ are the same as Lists on Twitter

You can have both private and public lists. In private lists, you can add anyone to it and see just the tweets from those people. They will not be notified that they were added to a list. You can add someone to a list and not follow them. This is a great way to keep tabs on your competition. (You really couldn’t do that on G+ as everyone was notified when added to a circle.)

Public lists, however, are open to the public and anyone can “subscribe” to the lists. People will be notified when you add them to a list as well as the name of the list.

Twitter has Collections, too. If you just want to save a tweet to read later, you can like it. But if you’d like to save useful information categorized, then you use a collection.

A great tool for Twitter to monitor lists and collections is TweetDeck. It’s a free tool by Twitter for Twitter. With G+ you had to use a 3rd party tool like HootSuite to monitor everything — which is free to a point.

TweetDeck Monitoring Twitter

The only thing Twitter doesn’t have like G+ is Communities, but you can go to Facebook and LinkedIn to join groups.

Get Better Data and Reach with Twitter

Twitter’s analytics are much better than on G+. They tell you your most popular tweets, your most connected follower, what your followers like, gender and location. With a tool like Audiense, you can also get the best time to Tweet when you have the greatest potential to get the most reach.

Best time to tweet

One thing that Twitter has that G+ didn’t have is paid advertising, which is why I think that Google didn’t pay much attention to G+ because it wasn’t an income-producer. On Twitter, you can do paid ads and specifically target your best audience.

What's Trending on TwitterAnother thing that Twitter has that G+ once had, but they took it away, is what’s trending. That’s a list at any given time of what users are tweeting about the most. On most trends you can take advantage and spin your marketing message and get extra exposure. Always check to see why something is trending before you take advantage of it.

Twitter is also the place to go to get the latest, real-time, news. G+ was never that. 

Back over at Google, brick-and-mortar businesses still have Google My Business and larger organizations can use G-Suitewhich will have a intranet-like version of G+.

All in all, losing Google+ is just one less platform to worry about. I always liked Twitter better.

One thing’s for sure, if you’re trying to market your business in today’s world, you need to learn as much as you can about all the major networks especially which ones to use to reach your target market.

 

 

 

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